Suitable Helper

Suitable Helper

“She is rounder than the moon and far more faithful.”

Earlier this week, I heard a poem by Lucille Clifton. I’m still thinking about some of the words.

I think about the moon a lot. Not the actual moon, I guess. Perhaps I think more often about the effects of the gravitational pull of the moon on nature and us. The moon affects our behavior in a predictable pattern. At times, the pattern is comforting. We know what’s coming, and yet, it manages to catch us off-guard, sparking delight, outrage, and everything in between.

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Psychic Desert

Psychic Desert

Image: Canva

If you consider yourself a writer or a creator, there have probably been times when you forced yourself to create. I do, and I have.

Even though I am filling up my cup in terms of work, I want to keep finding the words to communicate what goes on in the depths of my being.

I imagine there are people who quietly beg me not to humiliate myself with my writing, but for every one of them, there is someone else who deliciously looks forward to it…

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Whirlwind

Whirlwind

Photo by Nita on Pexels.com

The last 30 days were a whirlwind.

It was a lot of work and just a little play, but it felt invigorating. I did good work and it has motivated me to take on a new project.

This week, I’ll explore that, but I’m also making time to rest and to be quiet.

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Quote

Removing the Mask and the “Blindfolds”

“In the Southwest, [Wild Woman] is also known as La Que Sabé, The One Who Knows. I first heard of La Que Sabé when I lived in the Sangre de Cristo mountains in New Mexico, under the heart of Lobo Peak.”

“An old witch from Ranchos told me that La Que Sabé had created women from a wrinkle on the sole of her divine feet. This is why women are knowing creatures; they are made, in essence, of skin of the sole, which feels everything.”

“This idea that the skin of the foot is sentient had the ring of truth, for an acculturated Kiché tribeswoman once told me that she’d worn her first pair of shoes when she was twenty years old and was still not used to walking con los ojos vendados, with blindfolds on her feet.”

—Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Ph.D.

As our small group of three adults and one child walked the nature trail in Camarillo a few days ago, a man mentioned to one person in our group as he passed us, “Thank you for wearing your mask.”

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